by Liam Crowe
CEO and Master Dog Behavioral Therapist
Bark Busters USA

The holidays are a busy time for many households. Friends and family come and go, deliveries are made to the door, delicious smells emanate from the kitchen, and a general happy hubbub means that something special is happening. Among those affected by these changes is the family dog.

While one dog may revel in the change of pace, another may find it a confusing, stressful time. Your normally placid dog may suddenly begin to exhibit unusual behaviors, such as stealing food, jumping up on people, or growling or snapping at visitors. As pack leader, you need to communicate and demonstrate to your dog that while his world may be different, you will continue to keep him safe and secure.

When an insecure dog—no matter his size or breed—encounters a new situation, he doesn’t know what to do. If he feels threatened, he may react defensively with a snap or bite. 

On the other hand, a well socialized dog is comfortable meeting and being with others, both dogs and people. He has been introduced to a variety of situations and knows he and his pack have remained safe through them all. 

Following are some tips to help calm your dog and keep everyone in the home safe during the active holiday season.

Children visitors
Dogs that live in a household with no children may not be comfortable when kids come to visit. The chaos created by youngsters like grandchildren will inherently raise the energy level in the house, causing the dog to worry or stress. Here are some ways to control such situations if your dog does not cope well with children.

  • Always supervise kids (especially very young children) and dogs when they are alone together. This is when most dog bites to children occur.
  • With a very young child, parents must be vigilant and monitor their tot’s interactions with the dog. Parents should teach children of all ages to treat dogs with respect and gentleness.
  • Never invite a child to feed the dog by hand—this teaches the dog it is acceptable to take any food from a child. Because of a child’s small size, the dog may view her as an equal and thus may try to take advantage of the situation.

 

Boundaries and security
Dogs need to have their own “home,” a place where they feel secure and calm. If your dog doesn’t already have a place of his own, create one for him. 

  • A crate or pet carrier provides a natural safe haven for your dog. Keep his crate or dog pillow in a quiet area of the home, and direct your dog to go there when you need to set boundaries. While he may not like being separated from you, he will still feel secure.
  • If your dog begins to bark or nip at visitors, remove him from the area and keep him in his safe place until your guests have gone.
  • Keep the dog out of certain rooms where he can get underfoot. For example, training your dog to stay out of the kitchen—where most household accidents occur—is a good safety measure. It also helps to prevent your dog from begging for food.
  • If you travel during the holidays, taking his crate/carrier will help your dog feel more relaxed, since “home” is wherever he finds you and his familiar bed. 


Elderly dogs
Elderly dogs may not enjoy the extra hustle and bustle of the holiday season. Be mindful of keeping your older dog comfortable when his routine is disrupted.

  • If your elderly dog gets cranky around visitors, simply take him to his special quiet place where he won’t be bothered and can feel secure.
  • Remind children to be respectful of your older dog. Always provide supervision when dogs and kids are together.

 

Front door behaviors
A knock on the door can be a stimulating event for a dog, whether he sees it as fun or alarming. It is natural for him to want to know who the visitor is to determine if they are friendly or not. However, a dog that explodes with excitement at the sound of the doorbell is both annoying and unsafe—he may dash out the door and run into harm’s way, he may get underfoot and become a trip hazard, he may knock people over, or he may become aggressive to the visitor.

  • To help your dog be calmer, exercise him prior to the arrival of guests. After 30 minutes of walking or playing, your dog will more likely be relaxed or want to nap.
  • As a general rule, don’t allow the family dog to greet unfamiliar guests because commotion and unusual circumstances can cause stress for dogs.
  • Consider putting your dog on a leash as guests arrive to maintain better control of him.
  • Teach your dog to sit and stay on command. When the doorbell rings, put him in a sit-stay and do not open the door until he calms down.
  • If your dog gets overly excited with arriving visitors, remove him from the scene ahead of time. Place him in his crate in a quiet room, and then let him join the party later.


By anticipating how your dog may react to new activities and visitors, you can help ensure that everyone—both two- and four-legged—has a fun and safe holiday season.


Liam Crowe is CEO of Bark Busters and a master dog behavioral therapist. Bark Busters, the world’s largest dog trainingcompany, has trained more than 400,000 dogs worldwide using its all-natural, dog-friendly methods. Bark Busters training is the only service of its kind that offers a written lifetime guarantee. With hundreds of offices in 41 states and 10 countries, Bark Busters is continuing its mission to enhance the human-canine relationship and reduce the possibility of maltreatment, abandonment, and euthanasia of companion dogs. For more details, call 1-877-500-BARK (2275) or visitwww.BarkBusters.com to find a dog trainer in your area, complete a Dog Behavior Quiz, or learn about becoming a Bark Busters franchise owner.

© copyright 2007 Bark Busters USA, All Rights Reserved

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